Impact Awards 2019

Impact Awards 2019

Impact Awards 2019

Impact Awards 2019

Impact Awards 2019

Annual awards show for advertising giant FCB Chicago, featuring defused grenades as prizes.

Annual awards show for advertising giant FCB Chicago, featuring defused grenades as prizes.

Annual awards show for advertising giant FCB Chicago, featuring defused grenades as prizes.

Annual awards show for advertising giant FCB Chicago, featuring defused grenades as prizes.

Annual awards show for advertising giant FCB Chicago, featuring defused grenades as prizes.

Year
-
2019

Year
-
2019

Year
-
2019

Year
-
2019

Year
-
2019

Role
-
Show opener
Bumpers
Design
Direction

Role
-
Show opener
Category bumpers
Design
Direction

Role
-
Show opener
Category bumpers
Design
Direction

Role
-
Show opener
Category bumpers
Design
Direction

Role
-
Show opener
Category bumpers
Design
Direction

Audio
-
Guggenz
Moderator
MtBrd
Sixfingerz
The Geek x Vrv

Audio
-
Guggenz
Moderator
MtBrd
Sixfingerz
The Geek x Vrv

Audio
-
Guggenz
Moderator
MtBrd
Sixfingerz
The Geek x Vrv

Audio
-
Guggenz
Moderator
MtBrd
Sixfingerz
The Geek x Vrv

Audio
-
Guggenz
Moderator
MtBrd
Sixfingerz
The Geek x Vrv

Credits
-
Brian Steckel
Patricia Witt
So A Ryu
Jack Fleming
Alex Johnson

Other designers
-
Brian Steckel

Other designers
-
Brian Steckel

Other designers
-
Brian Steckel

Other designers
-
Brian Steckel

Conception

Conception

Conception

Conception

Conception

The Impact Awards are hosted annually at FCB's company party, Town Hall. For one night, all 800 employees at the Chicago office gather in a rented out building in the West Loop to celebrate the agency's best work for the year.

Brian Steckel and I were tasked with creating a show opener as well as a complete graphics package including category bumpers, presenter titles, and award winner animations for the event.

Below is a compilation of the category bumpers used at the event.

The Impact Awards are hosted annually at FCB's company party, Town Hall. For one night, all 800 employees at the Chicago office gather in a rented out building in the West Loop to celebrate the agency's best work for the year.

Brian Steckel and I were tasked with creating a show opener as well as a complete graphics package including category bumpers, presenter titles, and award winner animations for the event.

Below is a compilation of the category bumpers used at the event.

The Impact Awards are hosted annually at FCB's company party, Town Hall. For one night, all 800 employees at the Chicago office gather in a rented out building in the West Loop to celebrate the agency's best work for the year.

Brian Steckel and I were tasked with creating a show opener as well as a complete graphics package including category bumpers, presenter titles, and award winner animations for the event.

Below is a compilation of the category bumpers used at the event.

The Impact Awards are hosted annually at FCB's company party, Town Hall. For one night, all 800 employees at the Chicago office gather in a rented out building in the West Loop to celebrate the agency's best work for the year.

Brian Steckel and I were tasked with creating a show opener as well as a complete graphics package including category bumpers, presenter titles, and award winner animations for the event.

Below is a compilation of the category bumpers used at the event.

The Impact Awards are hosted annually at FCB's company party, Town Hall. For one night, all 800 employees at the Chicago office gather in a rented out building in the West Loop to celebrate the agency's best work for the year.

Brian Steckel and I were tasked with creating a show opener as well as a complete graphics package including category bumpers, presenter titles, and award winner animations for the event.

Below is a compilation of the category bumpers used at the event.

Process

Process

Process

Process

Process

Production of the show opener began with modelling the neon sign that served as the centerpiece for the film. Given that the entire piece takes place within the sign itself, it was crucial that the innards of the sign were modelled accurately. Each latch holding the fluorescent tubes were counted for, as well as the rubber containers housing either end of the bulbs. We heavily relied on Cinema 4D's instance system, which allowed us to make fast tweaks globally to objects that were repeated dozens of times in the project.

The entire graphics package was made in tandem with client work so we knew going into the category bumpers that there was a lot of room for optimization. We wanted to maintain the 3D look, but didn't want to take the time to intricately hand-model signs for all 6 categories.

To solve this, we designed each set of signs in 2D with Illustrator and imported the paths into Cinema 4D. The bodies of each sign were made up of shape layers, and the bulbs made up of paths. To construct the signs in 3D, it was just a matter of extruding the shape layers that made up the sign bodies, and creating sweeps from the Illustrator paths for the bulbs. We were effectively able to skip the labor intensive process of hand modelling each sign with this method. Adding rain, post effects and foreground objects gave off the illusion of a much more intricate shot.

At the time of this project, the studio had just made the investment into new computers specialized for CG work. We were able to utilize the hardware and make use of GPU rendering techniques. This allowed for much faster render times for things like physically accurate reflections and glass refractions in the fluorescent bulbs. Had we not had access to this new hardware, the entire project would not have been feasible.

Production of the show opener began with modelling the neon sign that served as the centerpiece for the film. Given that the entire piece takes place within the sign itself, it was crucial that the innards of the sign were modelled accurately. Each latch holding the fluorescent tubes were counted for, as well as the rubber containers housing either end of the bulbs. We heavily relied on Cinema 4D's instance system, which allowed us to make fast tweaks globally to objects that were repeated dozens of times in the project.

The entire graphics package was made in tandem with client work so we knew going into the category bumpers that there was a lot of room for optimization - We wanted to maintain the 3D look, but didn't want to take the time to intricately hand-model signs for all 6 categories.

To solve, we designed each set of signs in 2D with Illustrator and imported the paths into Cinema 4D. The bodies of each sign were made up of shape layers, and the bulbs made up of paths. To construct the signs in 3D, it was just a matter of extruding the shape layers that made up the sign bodies, and creating sweeps from the Illustrator paths for the bulbs. We were effectively able to skip the labor intensive process of hand modelling each sign with this method - with added rain, post effects, and foreground objects, it gives the illusion of a much more intricate shot.

At the time of this project, the studio had just made the investment into new computers specialized for CG work. We were able to utilize the hardware and make use of GPU rendering techniques. This allowed for much faster render times for things like physically accurate reflections, and glass refractions in the fluorescent bulbs. Had we not had access to this new hardware, the entire project would not have been feasible.

Production of the show opener began with modelling the neon sign that served as the centerpiece for the film. Given that the entire piece takes place within the sign itself, it was crucial that the innards of the sign were modelled accurately. Each latch holding the fluorescent tubes were counted for, as well as the rubber containers housing either end of the bulbs. We heavily relied on Cinema 4D's instance system, which allowed us to make fast tweaks globally to objects that were repeated dozens of times in the project.

The entire graphics package was made in tandem with client work so we knew going into the category bumpers that there was a lot of room for optimization - We wanted to maintain the 3D look, but didn't want to take the time to intricately hand-model signs for all 6 categories.

To solve, we designed each set of signs in 2D with Illustrator and imported the paths into Cinema 4D. The bodies of each sign were made up of shape layers, and the bulbs made up of paths. To construct the signs in 3D, it was just a matter of extruding the shape layers that made up the sign bodies, and creating sweeps from the Illustrator paths for the bulbs. We were effectively able to skip the labor intensive process of hand modelling each sign with this method - with added rain, post effects, and foreground objects, it gives the illusion of a much more intricate shot.

At the time of this project, the studio had just made the investment into new computers specialized for CG work. We were able to utilize the hardware and make use of GPU rendering techniques. This allowed for much faster render times for things like physically accurate reflections, and glass refractions in the fluorescent bulbs. Had we not had access to this new hardware, the entire project would not have been feasible.

Production of the show opener began with modelling the neon sign that served as the centerpiece for the film. Given that the entire piece takes place within the sign itself, it was crucial that the innards of the sign were modelled accurately. Each latch holding the fluorescent tubes were counted for, as well as the rubber containers housing either end of the bulbs. We heavily relied on Cinema 4D's instance system, which allowed us to make fast tweaks globally to objects that were repeated dozens of times in the project.

The entire graphics package was made in tandem with client work so we knew going into the category bumpers that there was a lot of room for optimization - We wanted to maintain the 3D look, but didn't want to take the time to intricately hand-model signs for all 6 categories.

To solve, we designed each set of signs in 2D with Illustrator and imported the paths into Cinema 4D. The bodies of each sign were made up of shape layers, and the bulbs made up of paths. To construct the signs in 3D, it was just a matter of extruding the shape layers that made up the sign bodies, and creating sweeps from the Illustrator paths for the bulbs. We were effectively able to skip the labor intensive process of hand modelling each sign with this method - with added rain, post effects, and foreground objects, it gives the illusion of a much more intricate shot.

At the time of this project, the studio had just made the investment into new computers specialized for CG work. We were able to utilize the hardware and make use of GPU rendering techniques. This allowed for much faster render times for things like physically accurate reflections, and glass refractions in the fluorescent bulbs. Had we not had access to this new hardware, the entire project would not have been feasible.

Production of the show opener began with modelling the neon sign that served as the centerpiece for the film. Given that the entire piece takes place within the sign itself, it was crucial that the innards of the sign were modelled accurately. Each latch holding the fluorescent tubes were counted for, as well as the rubber containers housing either end of the bulbs. We heavily relied on Cinema 4D's instance system, which allowed us to make fast tweaks globally to objects that were repeated dozens of times in the project.

The entire graphics package was made in tandem with client work so we knew going into the category bumpers that there was a lot of room for optimization - We wanted to maintain the 3D look, but didn't want to take the time to intricately hand-model signs for all 6 categories.

To solve, we designed each set of signs in 2D with Illustrator and imported the paths into Cinema 4D. The bodies of each sign were made up of shape layers, and the bulbs made up of paths. To construct the signs in 3D, it was just a matter of extruding the shape layers that made up the sign bodies, and creating sweeps from the Illustrator paths for the bulbs. We were effectively able to skip the labor intensive process of hand modelling each sign with this method - with added rain, post effects, and foreground objects, it gives the illusion of a much more intricate shot.

At the time of this project, the studio had just made the investment into new computers specialized for CG work. We were able to utilize the hardware and make use of GPU rendering techniques. This allowed for much faster render times for things like physically accurate reflections, and glass refractions in the fluorescent bulbs. Had we not had access to this new hardware, the entire project would not have been feasible.

end_scene
townhall_still_02
end_scene_2
townhall_still_01

Event space

Event space

Event space

Event space

Event space

Brian Steckel and I worked with the experiential department in creating an identity for the event. The theme this year was heavily influenced by retro diners and the neon signage often found within.

I helped with designing content that was projection mapped on walls throughout the event building. The content appropriately explored typical dilemmas faced everyday in the advertising world.

Brian Steckel and I worked with the experiential department in creating an identity for the event. The theme this year was heavily influenced by retro diners and the neon signage often found within.

I helped with designing content that was projection mapped on walls throughout the event building. The content appropriately explored typical dilemmas faced everyday in the advertising world.

Brian Steckel and I worked with the experiential department in creating an identity for the event. The theme this year was heavily influenced by retro diners and the neon signage often found within.

I helped with designing content that was projection mapped on walls throughout the event building. The content appropriately explored typical dilemmas faced everyday in the advertising world.

Brian Steckel and I worked with the experiential department in creating an identity for the event. The theme this year was heavily influenced by retro diners and the neon signage often found within.

I helped with designing content that was projection mapped on walls throughout the event building. The content appropriately explored typical dilemmas faced everyday in the advertising world.

Brian Steckel and I worked with the experiential department in creating an identity for the event. The theme this year was heavily influenced by retro diners and the neon signage often found within.

I helped with designing content that was projection mapped on walls throughout the event building. The content appropriately explored typical dilemmas faced everyday in the advertising world.

impact_awards_embed_01
impact_awards_embed_02
event_still_02
event_still_03

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